4NCL: 20 - 21 March 2004

Saturday 20 March

   

WESSEX 1

 

v

WHITE ROSE

 

1

w

Poulton, James 2366

1 - 0

Gourlay, Iain 2294

2

b

Webb, Richard M 2348

-

Gayson, Peter M 2239

3

w

Corkett, Anthony R 2314

-

Adams, David M 2186

4

b

Simons, Martin J 2285

0 - 1

Barrett, Steve J 2146

5

w

Upton, Ian J 2224

-

Burnett, Jim 2205

6

b

Default  

0 - 1

Taylor, Robert K 2171

7

w

Yeo, Michael J 2244

-

van Kemenade, Rudy 2119

8

b

Default  

0 - 1

van Kemenade, Julie (F) 1680
       

3 - 5

   

Tony Corkett reports:

A nightmare!

Strong winds blowing down trees, stranded Rawle on a train somewhere between Birmingham & Telford. The arbiter helpfully extended the default time to 90 minutes, but Rawle didn't arrive until 5.50 pm, 230 minutes late! Teresa's problems were of a rather different nature in that she was "gated" by her headmistress and also arrived late. So, 2-0 down before we started, this put a lot of pressure on the rest of us and we were unable to make up the deficit.

Ian’s game was the first to finish, with the point divided. Richard turned down a draw offer, but was unable to make progress in a double rook ending. Martin's long running invincibility with the Black pieces at last came to an end, with his opponent playing an interesting line against Martin’s Benko, and after winning material, he never let him off the hook. The most unfortunate result occurred in Michael's game:

Having been the exchange and a pawn up for almost the whole game, and now moving inexorably up the board towards the full point, Michael failed to spot the net that his King had walked in to, and played 53.Ra7?. After the reply Na5+, a draw was agreed. As Michael said afterwards, the only consolation was that there were 8 rook moves that would have been worse!

Jim turned his game into a lottery with both sides having 2 minutes for 17 moves (except that he was winning a piece). Jim was particularly aggressive in his game, and his 2294 rated opponent was simply overwhelmed.

I was relieved that I didn't have to try and win a drawn R+4P v R+3P ending to save the match:

Corkett,A (2314) - Adams,D (2186)

It had been quite a slog, until at this point we found ourselves in the most open position of the game so far. My continuation was 30.Nf6+ but Fritz tells me that with this move 'white lets it slip away'. Certainly, there is a stronger continuation, which gives good chances for some king chasing, with little risk attached. I would have needed a bit more time than I actually had at this point, to work it through though. My opponent mentioned after the game that he thought white was probably winning here, and a little analysis seems to bear this out

[ 30.Rxd6! Qxd6 ( 30...hxg4 31.Rc6 Qd8 32.Bd5 Ne6 33.hxg4 and with 2 strong bishops, a pawn up, and b6 under attack, Fritz assesses this as winning, which I am inclined to agree with) 31.Nh6+ Kh7 ( or running the other way 31...Kf8 32.Qh8+ Ke7 33.Bg5+ Kd7 34.Nxf7 Qd1+ 35.Kh2 Ne6 36.Ne5+ the white pieces are just too active here 36...Kc7 37.Qh7+ N8g7 38.Bf6 and black is losing material) 32.Nxf7 Qd1+ 33.Kh2 Ng7 (to stop Qh8mate) 34.Ng5+ Kh8 35.Qf6 Qd3 36.Bd4 Rg8 37.Nf7+ Kh7 38.Qg5 Nf5 to stop Qh6 39.Qh6+ anyway, leads to a nice mate 39...Nxh6 40.Ng5#]

30...Nxf6 31.Qxf6 Be5 32.Qc6 Qxc6 33.Bxc6 Rc8 34.Bd5 Kg7 35.Rb1 Na4 36.Kg2 Nb2 37.Bxb6 Nxc4 38.Bxc4 Rxc4 39.Rb5 Bc3 40.Bxa5 Bxa5 41.Rxa5 Rc3

and in this theoretically drawn position with nothing to play for from the match point of view, the game eventually petered out to a draw on move 50.

 The new super slim Richard (looking a million dollars) decided not to join the curry expedition as a self-imposed penalty for not having won his game. I’m wondering whether Richard’s new image has anything to do with the negotiations going on for the next James Bond movie, in which numerous people have been mentioned as possible to replace Pierce Brosnan. After all, if Max Deveraux can get in on the TV scene, who knows? Anyway, we hope that Richard isn’t going to maintain this strict penalty regime or there is just a slim chance we may not see him out this season.

Sunday 21 March

   

GUILDFORD-ADC 2

 

v

WESSEX 1

 

1

w

Cherniaev, Alexander 2496

1 - 0

Poulton, James 2366

2

b

Povah, Nigel E 2369

1 - 0

Webb, Richard M 2348

3

w

Thompson, Ian D 2281

0 - 1

Corkett, Anthony R 2314

4

b

Granat, Russell G 2252

0 - 1

Simons, Martin J 2285

5

w

Jackson, Adrian 2217

-

Yeo, Michael J 2244

6

b

Anderton, Matthew N 2242

0 - 1

Allicock, Rawle A 2279

7

w

Richardson, Keith B 2219

0 - 1

Upton, Ian J 2224

8

b

Yurenok, Maria S (F) 2100

0 - 1

Khoo, Teresa (F) 2044
       

2-5

   

Tony Corkett reports again:

What a difference a day makes!

On Saturday night we talked long and hard about how to outwit our Sunday opponents with our team order, and eventually decided simply to swap our boards 5 & 7, a nuance that was negated when the team lists went up, and Guildford had done exactly the same! As expected, they strengthened their 2nd team board 1, as their first team was facing much weaker opposition. What seemed a little strange was that they had a lady playing on board 8 of the 2nd team, but were defaulting the lady board in the 1st team. This clearly contravened the rules (and just to be on the safe side, I checked with Jonathan Rogers – who knows these things). The general consensus amongst the team members available for discussion was that we appeal, so this was hastily written out and submitted to the arbiter about 5-10 minutes before the match got under way. The match duly started, but then my game was delayed and the clock stopped because the arbiter wanted to explain his reasoning to me for not changing his decision. The reasons didn’t sound correct so I requested that our appeal eventually be passed to the Board for further consideration and future clarification. As it turned out, no harm was done, as Teresa, unaware of the controversy, won her game in good fashion anyway.

Ian remarked after the match was over, that at some point late on, he had looked down the line of Wessex players and the whole team was totally concentrated on their games - and the effort paid off.

Jim’s opponent set about dominating e5 in a French, managed to secure a Knight on c6, and this was a thorn that wasn’t going to go away.

Richard found himself in a position that his opponent knew very well, and as early as 12.Qc2 it looked like a very difficult position to hold. A tactical melee ensued, but once the g-file was open, it always looked likely to favor black.

And then the tide turned……….

Martin, encouraged to play with the white pieces for a change, was happy to accept a pawn and then keep it as simple as he could, going on to win, despite the spanners his opponent kept trying to throw in to the works.

Rawle allowed his queen to get trapped, but with his opponent having 1 minute for 14 moves, he was able to extricate himself. Sitting next to him, Michael was particularly appreciative of Rawle’s decision to go off for a smoke with 4 moves still to make, which greatly reduced the neighboring piece-banging distractions!

Ian’s win against Keith Richardson (a postal GM) was particularly impressive and well worth playing though in it’s entirety. Ian nullified everything his opponent tried to do, and eventually, dominating the board, crashed through white's position from all angles.

3-2 up, Michael was offered a draw. He thought that I was winning and Teresa wasn't losing, so accepted. My win turned out to be rather more problematical than he thought, but eventually I managed to arrange my pieces so that they were all defending each other, and 2 pieces down, my opponent resigned. Having survived the time control, Teresa won a pawn, and then another, and eventually the game.

The appeal clarification was forthcoming pretty quickly after the dust had settled, by e-mail, confirming that defaults have to be taken on the lowest board possible. This in turn generated quite a few e-mails with feedback being sent in by a number of team captains during the course of the week.

This leaves us in 3rd place and curiously, still one of the favorites to win the league according to Betsson, where some interesting odds are being offered. Guildford for example are as high as 50/1 and have the muscle to have a serious affect on the result of this league yet.


Last modified: April 4, 2004

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